Homework Secrets Your Children Will Thank You For: Episode 72

Join us at Power of Moms for a fun podcast featuring specific ideas to make "homework time" totally effective (and enjoyable!).

School is starting for children all over the United States, and with that comes mounds of paperwork, tests, book reports, science projects, and all kinds of homework our children will be tempted to procrastinate. (Remember those days?)

So we thought it would be fun to record a podcast all about our favorite homework secrets that help us (and our children) to avoid procrastination and actually get things done.

The simplest, most effective tip we’ll be discussing is this:

Learn to identify Next Actions.  

The term “Next Action” is from the book Getting Things Done, by David Allen, and it’s defined as “the next physical, visible activity that will move a project toward completion.”  Instead of focusing on how overwhelming a project or assignment can be, we simply focus on the very next task that needs to be done.

Corporate executives are trained in this, but who’s going to teach it to our children?

That would be us.

Saren and April will be sharing real-life stories, so if you’d like to hear about our very best practices for teaching children to confidently move forward on their assignments, this podcast is for you.

 

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homework kitCheck out our Organizing for School Success Kit for lots more ideas, printable charts, and further podcasts to help you fully implement the ideas in this podcast and drastically reduce the mess of papers and the stress of homework in your home.

 

QUESTION: Do you have some additional homework “secrets” you’d like to share?

CHALLENGE: Listen to this podcast and choose one anti-procrastination technique you can easily implement into your family routine.

 

 

Music from Creations by Michael R. Hicks.

Photo from: freedigitalphotos.net

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Comments

  1. says

    I absolutely loved this! I’ve learned to think this way but teaching it to my kids hasn’t been as easy. I appreciate the examples and concrete ideas you’ve shared. So great for adult-sized projects too! Thank you!

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